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Grapevine

Grapevine

12.5 inches wide x 18.5 inches long
32 cm x 47 cm

This little quilt features  a digitally embroidered grapevine design which I’ve extended by adding hand painted bunches of grapes and extra leaves. I worked the embroidery over a digitally quilted design and combined it with free motion machine quilting. The fruits and leaves I’ve added have been painted with acrylic fabric paints and finally I embellished the work with lots of hand stitched French knots. The cotton fabric base is a digital print of some flaking plaster Laura photographed on holiday in Portugal. I liked the idea of the vine scrambling over the ancient wall of the house!

£110 includes postage to the UK.

Available

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Lemon tree

Lemon Tree

12.5 inches wide x 21 inches long
32 cm x 54 cm

This pretty little quilt features a digitally embroidered leafy branch to which I have added hand painted lemons and a few extra leaves. The quilt is densely quilted with free motion machine stitch in a matt cotton thread that contrasts nicely with the lustre of the rayon stitched embroidery. It has a hidden hanging sleeve on the reverse and is all ready to display. Might look perfect in a kitchen or dining room don’t you think?

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Waterlilies

Waterlilies

10.5 inches wide x 23 inches long
27 cm x 58 cm

This pretty little quilt features a digital print of one of my pastel paintings. It has been free motion machine quilted using a variegated rayon thread. The lovely fern motif was digitally embroidered and finally hand painted using metallic fabric paints.

£110 includes postage to the UK.

Available

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Silver Trees

Silver Trees

39 inches wide x 39 inches long
100cm x 100cm

This quilt was made to satisfy a challenge for our Thr3fold exhibiting group. It was inspired by a fabulous sunset viewed one evening during the drive from the hills above Vancouver to downtown. The silver trees that gave the quilt its name were a beautiful feature of the garden of fellow Thr3fold member, Catherine Nicholls. Lit from below their white trunks shone theatrically through the dark night! I used marbled fabrics discovered at the Quilt Museum at La Conner together with my hand dyes. The piece has been free motion machine quilted and I’ve accentuated the effect of the feather motifs within the quilting by highlighting them with metallic, copper fabric paint. One edge of the quilt has been embellished with natural shell buttons secured with bright red thread to echo some of the colours of the marbled fabric.

£350 includes postage to the UK.

Available

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Fish Shoal

Fish shoal

31 inches x 24 inches
79 cm x 61 cm

This is a really quirky quilt featuring many of my favourite techniques. There’s monoprinting, lino block printing, discharge printing, strip patchwork, free motion quilting and fabric painting. The strange fish swim through a curtain of metallic gold fronds which I have free motion quilted and then hand painted. The quilt has a hidden sleeve ready for hanging – all you will need is a suitable batten.

SOLD

 

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Have you taken a look in my shop lately?

Have you taken a look in my shop lately?

I’m always ricocheting between my love of painting and my passion for stitch. There are never enough hours in the day for it all, especially when the fabrics are slow stitched by hand or the paintings involve many layers of translucent glazes. Let’s just say, I’m never at a loss for something to occupy my time! We’ve recently added a short course about the potential of simple running stitch to our designmatterstv site and I thought if you hadn’t seen that you might like to see a landscape I worked with the techniques. It’s a lovely rhythmical way to sew and the subtle colour changes are so beautiful. I think it’s a perfect activity for stress busting!

I love to sit and sew in the garden whenever I can and often the plants and wildlife I see there become my inspiration. Today was a perfect  25C and sunny so I took advantage of the opportunity to mount two appliquéd and embroidered pieces onto box panels ready for display. They are really heavily stitched and I’ve loved combining the slow hand stitching with free motion machine quilting too. I’ve added them to my online shop if you’d like to see more images or think you might like to find them a new home!

Now, after all that stitching,  it might be time to get the paints out for a change. The green woodpecker is acrylic on a wooden panel but I’m in the mood for some lovely watercolour now – maybe a few of the lilies that are just opening today will feature – I’ll let you know how it goes!

Bye for now,
Linda x

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Magenta Leaves

Magenta Leaves

The stitched panel measures 13.5 inches x 13.5 inches
34cm x 34cm

It’s mounted onto a black box canvas panel which measures
15.75 inches x 15.75 inches x 1.5inches
40 cm x 40 cm x 4cm

This piece was inspired by the persicaria that we grow in our garden. I used rusted fabrics as the foundation with appliquéd fine silk, tulle and gauze. It is heavily embroidered by hand and is ready for display  on its black box canvas panel.

Available

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Autumn Leaves

Autumn Leaves

This appliquéd and embroidered panel was inspired by an ancient farm building I spotted on a walk near my home. The windows had long gone and the plants and trees were invading the space. The leaves were touched with the first signs of cold weather colour. I’ve worked with a wide range of fabrics including hand dyed cotton, fine silk and tulle. There is a combination of free motion machine quilting and lots of hand stitched detail and I’ve modified some of the layers with  a delicate touch of pale pastel.

The appliquéd and embroidered panel measures 13.5 inches x 13.5 inches
34cm x 34cm

It’s mounted onto a black box canvas panel which measures
15.75 inches x 15.75 inches x 1.5inches
40 cm x 40 cm x 4cm

It is ready for display and needs no frame.

Available

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I’m featured in Quilting Arts Magazine!

I'm featured in Quilting Arts Magazine!

As you may remember, since I’ve had the loan of an embroidery machine from Husqvarna Viking, I’ve been experimenting with using both the built in designs and those in the library of My Sewnet. The rosebud design shown here provided a perfect opportunity to add fabric paint within the stitched outlines of the flower and its leaves. I worked this in a grey Madeira rayon thread onto hand dyed cotton fabric, layering the fabric with cotton batting and a cotton backing so the stitched design quilted the layers rather than just embroidering on a single layer of cloth.

Sometimes I’ve chosen filled designs instead of outlines. They showcase the lustre of the threads and create beautifully rich and detailed surfaces. I’ve extended the digital designs with more fabric painted rosehips, rosebuds and leaves.  Lots of my examples are stitched onto old quilts that I’ve recycled. Embroidering onto an existing pieced and quilted fabric adds interesting colour and texture don’t you think? Of course it does present some problems too but I’ve chosen to ignore the existing quilting and simply work over it with both stitch and paint.

Working onto a quilted surface does mean that my leaves and especially the pears in the final image have strange linear patterns but I rather like the serendipity of that layered effect. The additions are hand painted with either fabric paints or artists’ acrylic paints mixed with textile medium. I particularly like the gleam of metallic paints!

I haven’t heard of anyone taking commercially available digital designs and making them completely their own in this way but, you know me, the control freak rears its head again! If you are interested to see more the Summer Issue 2022 of Quilting Arts Magazine has a feature.

Bye for now,
Linda x

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White Magnolia

White Magnolia

12 inches x 12 inches x 1.5 inches
30 cm x 30 cm x 4cm

This is an original watercolour painting of the Magnolia Stellata blooming in our garden against a backdrop of silvery artichoke leaves. It’s painted onto a deep edge box canvas panel that has been treated with a watercolour ground to enhance the texture and make the canvas receptive to the paint. The finished painting has been sealed with cold wax and is ready for display. It needs no frame.

SOLD

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Having fun with more painting!

Having fun with more painting

I tend towards the obsessive – once I discover something I like I have trouble resisting the urge to indulge completely. Watercolour ground is the latest obsession! The roses I’m showing here today were painted from photographs I took on a visit to David Austin Roses before lockdown. You’ve probably heard of the very famous garden centre I mean. If you visit in early summer the gardens are a treat for the senses with the perfume as heady as the sight of the flowers. The June day we were there was perfect – hot and sunny. I can’t wait to visit again but in the meantime I can enjoy the photos and use them to make a painting. The unconventional support I’m working on has an interesting origin itself – it was a panel taken from an old wardrobe we were getting rid of. When the wardrobe was broken up to be taken away it seemed a pity to waste the panels although, at the time, I had no idea what I’d use them for.

I mentioned watercolour ground in my previous post but then I’d only used it on canvas. When I spotted the wardrobe panels in a corner of my studio I thought they’d be ideal candidates to see how the ground would work with wood. The panel was very dark so the first thing I did was to give it a coat of white acrylic paint. Once that was dry I added a layer of the watercolour ground to the raised central section and put it aside overnight. It’s difficult to photograph anything that’s just white but the picture here shows the rough surface the coarse ground produces. That’s the effect after one application but you can add more or even create more texture if you prefer. Depends on the sort of painting you intend to make I think. I’ll let you know how I get on with a more textured landscape painting soon!

I often make a pale pencil sketch before I start painting with watercolour but the surface I had created was quite coarse and didn’t really lend itself to much of a drawing, so other than to mark vague outlines of where the flowers would sit, I didn’t spend much time on preliminary marks and just went straight in with the paint. This is still very much a work in progress but I am itching to get back to it and add more detail to the petals and more deep darks to the shadows between the leaves and buds. I’ll also be tidying up the border frame of the panel with another layer of acrylic paint.

It’s curious to discover how different it is to paint onto the surface prepared with the watercolour ground than it is on rough watercolour paper. I’m still learning how the paint reacts but  I’m loving it!

 

 

Bye for now,
Linda x